Writing Experimental Fiction Is Tricky

wefitSubmitting to editors who claim to want “experimental” fiction can be tricky. One editor may simply be looking for stories that are “fresh and creative; something I haven’t seen before.” Another may mean fiction “way outside the box” and “on the cutting edge”; stories written without restraint and without regard to writing conventions.

Ronald Sukenick, editor of Black Ice, noted for its “edgy” fiction, says “experimental fiction breaks away from the very narrow literary formula commercial writing usually imposes. When you break away from that, you open your fiction to a spectrum of possible styles and forms and release yourself of the taboos that hold those forms in place.”

Sukenick suggests to his writing students at the University of Colorado

Finding Those Hidden Blogging Markets

fthbmI got a call the other day from an editor of a magazine I never knew existed, asking me to give a speech to a whole group of editors of magazines I never knew existed. But this is more a reflection on my ignorance than on these editors or their magazines: Evidently there were enough of them to pull together a convention at a very nice resort in Colorado.

This particular group of editors shepherded the publishing of magazines for fraternities, sororities and other such societies. Turns out, there are quite a few such magazines — which shouldn’t be so surprising, if you think about how many such organizations there are. And they have at least modest budgets. Most have

WebZine Writing: Still A Possibility?

wzwWeb zines — that is, magazines posted on the World Wide Web and accessed via your computer, modem and Web browser — have matured in the past year, becoming fast, alert and ad-heavy. And an opportunity for freelance writers.

Many print magazines publish Web versions and hire freelancers to write Web-only articles. Content providers like Microsoft Network and America Online sub-contract with entrepreneurs to put together online-only publications that require a lot of new writing. And some recent start-ups, backed by excited venture capitalists, are electronic magazines that appear only on the Web.

Web zines want up-to-date reporting (lead time is typically a week or two), reviews, personal opinions and arguments on just about every subject covered in print. Their